Business Service Dept
66531218 | info@asg.sg
Mon-Fri: 9am-6pm, Sat: 12pm-4pm

Accounting Dept
65216738 | ufr@asg.sg
Mon-Fri: 9am-6pm

Print & Design Dept
66531508 | print@asg.sg
Mon-Fri: 9am-6pm, Sat: 12pm-4pm

VO Office Dept
65216752 | vo@asg.sg
Mon-Fri: 9am-6pm

Category: Business in Singapore

Insightful and dedicated experts in A.1 Business Pte Ltd are always ready and willing to provide assistance to any entrepreneur who’s keen on setting up their business in Singapore. Highly conscientious in their work, our team of professionals will provide a complete and comprehensive guide on the process of company registration in Singapore to interested parties.

Home Office Scheme in Singapore

The Home Office Scheme is a scheme which allows a company’s registered address to be their HDB address. Through this scheme, home-owners can conduct their business at home as long as they satisfy all the given criteria and guidelines which is subjected to URA’s approval. Implementation of this scheme should not bring about disturbance or inconvenience to the neighbourhood.

Please note that the approval is subject to the following:
a) general Terms & Conditions stipulated under the Home Office Scheme;
b) terms of the lease/tenancy agreement with HDB;
c) registration of your business/company with the Accounting & Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA);
d) HDB’s right to revoke approval granted under the Scheme if you breach any of the terms of the Scheme and lease/tenancy agreement, and the provision of the Housing & Development Act (Cap 129) or for any reason whatsoever.
After five years, you will need to renew your application.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR HOS:

  1. The conductor of the business must be the flat owner or any other authorised person approved by HDB and must continue to use the flat as his place of residence.
  2. In addition to the business use, it must also be used for residential uses and the business activities should be confined within the premises.
  3. The business has to be registered with ACRA, unless it has been exempted from registration under the Business Registration Act.
  4. The HDB flat cannot be used as a home office or a registered office for a society.
  5. The business must not
    1. generate extraneous noise, smoke, odour, liquid waste or dust that could become a nuisance.
    2. be illegal or unlawful.
    3. have any bad and immoral influences.
    4. introduce excessive human or vehicular traffic to the surrounding neighbourhood.
    5. adversely affect the character, ambience and environment of the residential estate.
  6. Any solicitation of business that may cause disturbance to the residents or public are disallowed, i.e. distribution of brochures, flyers or door-to-door visits.
  7. No selling of physical goods.
  8. No display of advertisements or posters.
  9. All necessary safety precautions must be taken to ensure that the business activities do not pose any danger.
  10. Electricity and structural load must not surpass the normal (residential) load.
  11. Storage and use of hazardous substances are strictly prohibited.
  12. The business must fulfil the fire safety requirements imposed by the Fire Safety and Shelter Department. Which are:
    1. To install one 1 x 2kg ABC Dry Chemical Powder fire extinguisher.
    2. To install one single-station smoke detector. (For enquiry on the fire safety requirements, please email SCDF_qp_consultant@scdf.gov.sg)
  13. The regulations of other government authorities and licences/approvals must be obtained before business can commence. To search for the licences/approvals, please visit https://licence1.business.gov.sg.

 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS:

  1. The premises to be used primarily for residential purposes with part or parts of the premises being used by the occupants as an office.
  2. The number of non-residents (such as employees, partners and directors) engaged in the business is limited to a maximum of 2.
  3. Owners must ensure that the activities of their business do not cause any disturbance to the neighbours or the residential neighbourhood.
  4. The businesses must satisfy the performance criteria.
  5. The business must be listed in the permitted business section under the Home Office scheme.
  6. Display of business signage outside the residential premises is not allowed.
  7. The use may be terminated if the business results in complaints from neighbouring residents.
  8. There will not be any increase in the floor area of the building even if there is a change in use of the relevant premises.
  9. No part of the relevant premises comprises of works that are unauthorised under the Planning Act.
  10. Any approval required from the relevant authority for the change in use of the relevant premises has to be obtained before making the changes in use of the relevant premises.
  11. Where the person lodging the registration form is not the owner of the relevant premises, a written consent from the owner of the premises has been obtained before the lodgement of the registration form.
  12. When the HO use ceases or if the HO permit is revoked due to a breach in conditions or guidelines, the use of the relevant premise as a Home Office shall be reverted back to residential use.

PERMITTED BUSINESS

  • Accountancy services
  • Architectural services
  • Consultancy services (business, engineering, IT, management or education)
  • Design/Advertising services
  • Insurance/Financial planning services
  • Real estate agencies
  • Technology based and knowledge intensive businesses
  • Transportation services
  • Trading office

NON-PERMITTED BUSINESS

  • Beauty, hair dressing or massage therapy services
  • Car trading business
  • Card reading/palm reading or fortune telling in any form
  • Catering/restaurants
  • Clinics and pharmacies (e.g. dental, medical, veterinary)
  • Commercial school (e.g. dance, music, language, tuition centre)
  • Courier business
  • Classes on dress-making and embroidery
  • Employment agency
  • Funeral chapels or homes
  • Maid agency
  • Mausoleums
  • Manufacturing, preparation or processing of any products and goods
  • Money lending businesses
  • Opticians
  • Repair activities (e.g. household appliances, electrical products, footwear, etc.)
  • Sales/marketing that involves conducting seminars and talks for large number of customers
  • Shops and any form of retail activity, including pet shops

12 Apr

More Singaporeans firms are using online platforms to raise funds

The Internet has helped to completely transform our modern world in more ways than most people can imagine.

It’s almost staggering to realize that the Internet as we know it isn’t even quite 20 years old, and maybe even more staggering that many of the online platforms that we take advantage of every single day weren’t even on our radar five or 10 years ago.

And though the overwhelming majority of the global press focuses on the kinds of online innovations deal with the business world, more and more people are starting to wake up to the social good that the Internet is helping to make possible.

Online communities are pulling together they are resources to change lives for the better

Make no mistake about it the Internet has completely and totally transformed the way that we go about communicating with one another. It has helped (may be more than anything else) to bring all corners of the planet closer together, and a lot of the online platforms out there today are springing up with a social focus in mind.

Groups like GiveAsia and Indiegogo are just some of these online platforms dedicated to helping individuals and organizations from all over the world raise money for different projects and efforts, with many of these initiatives designed specifically to help change lives all over the world.

Singapore in particular has been a major player in utilizing these platforms for social good, with more than 100 different campaigns going up on the social platform Indiegogo in just the last year.

The citizens of Singapore have been able to facilitate close to $240 million in donations for different social campaigns that impact lives all over the world, and a significant amount of that money has gone directly to those that need it most.

Online charitable communities are growing at an exponential rate

The amazing thing about these online charitable efforts is that they are only getting more and more involved on a daily basis.

In 2010, the people of Singapore had supported about 25 local charities through the Give Asia platform. In 2015, then number has grown to 250+ – with organizers expecting 2016 to report close to 400 different local charities being supported on this online initiative.

These charities range from pressing issues that face the global community like cancer research all the way down to smaller campaigns designed specifically to help the people of Singapore pay bills, buy groceries, or climb out of debt – and everything in between.

More and more organizations are getting involved with online platforms designed to raise funds for all kinds of groups and initiatives, and this doesn’t look like it’s going to be a trend that slows down anytime soon.

It will definitely be interesting to see what the shape and culture of the online fundraising is like in 10, 15, or even 20 years. The odds are pretty good that it too will change just as much and as rapidly as everything else on the Internet has – and it could usher in a level of global philanthropy never before seen in human history.

5 Apr

Things to Consider When Choosing a Virtual Office Space

If you’re interested in working remotely and you want to select the perfect virtual office space, you’ll appreciate our helpful quick guide. We are here to provide some expert tips which will assist you with choosing a truly practical place to work online. These days, more and more people are opting to work remotely, rather than going out to other work environments in order to earn money.

Things to Think About
Renting a workplace is one option (if working from home isn’t really something that you’re interested in). It’s important to shop around for spaces that you may rent, so that you don’t feel pressured to choose something that might not be perfect, simply because you have a deadline.

So, plan to get organized in advance. We recommend checking out four or five places before you make a final decision. Location should probably be your key consideration when looking for space for a virtual office. People should be able to get to your office easily and it should be central to other amenities, such as public transit, restaurants, banks and coffeehouses.

Only you, as a business owner, know which amenities and areas offer the most advantages.
Bear in mind that working from home has even more advantages, including convenience, lower overhead (you’ll pay one rental fee or mortgage payment, rather than carrying two) and tax benefits, such as the ability to write off some of what you spend on maintaining a virtual office via your yearly tax return.
If you employ others, having them work from virtual offices will also save you a lot of money. Most people do choose to open virtual offices from their own homes, primarily for convenience and in order to access lower overhead.

Find a Workable Infrastructure
Next, think about what you need to do from a virtual office. Is the space that you select (home or someone else) equipped with what you need? Some people want lightning-fast Web connections via fibre optic networks. Others don’t require this type of speed from Web connections. Everyone is different, so decide whether or not a prospective space is right for your needs and your preferred hardware. Of course, any space that you select should offer Internet access. This is vital and you’ll need to choose an Internet provider which offers excellent service and the lowest possible downtime statistics.

Now that you understand the basics, you’ll be ready to move forward and find the right virtual office. Whether you want something basic and affordable, such as a home office with a desk, chair and computer equipment, or want something more deluxe and elaborate, such as a loft space with high windows, fibre optics and an impressive foyer for greeting guests, you’ll understand which factors to think about and how to make a wise decision.

Lastly, your vision for your business may be a factor. If you’re interested in growing a company and employing others, rather than working alone, it may be better to rent. After all, when you do grow, the image of your company will matter and a rented space may appear more professional to others. Some entrepreneurs start out in home-based virtual offices and then upgrade to rented spaces when their businesses become more profitable.

15 Mar

Discover the Benefits of Virtual Offices

Working remotely is now more popular than ever before. In the Internet Age, a lot of people are choosing to perform work duties from their own homes, with a mind to accessing some pretty impressive advantages. Today, we’re going to talk about why virtual offices are so beneficial. Once you’ve gotten the inside scoop on the benefits of these virtual offices, you may just decide to work from home, too!

Key Advantages to Consider
The primary advantage of a virtual office is that you won’t need to leave home in order to make money. Since access to a Web connection and computer hardware will give you the power to produce and electronically dispatch work, as well as the ability to invoice clients online, it’s possible to take care of so many work-related tasks right from the comfort and privacy of your own home!

It’s all about embracing a thoroughly modern way of working, which will allow you to toil in your pajamas if you want to! Some people work full-time from virtual offices, while others work from virtual offices occasionally. These sorts of offices may be located almost anywhere where Internet access and electricity is available! As you’ve probably noticed, some people turn the tables at coffeehouses, such as Starbucks, into virtual offices and you can do the same!

Office Politics Will Decrease
When you work from a virtual office, you may find that the usual office politics woes dramatically decrease. Since you’ll deal with people via chat, email or Skype, rather than living with them all day in an office environment, you may find that working from a virtual office makes it easier to get things done, without the drama. However, a lot depends on the industry that you work in. You should commit to delivering great communication from your virtual office. Find the best programs, apps and hardware and use them in order to stay in the loop. This will help you to maintain a consistent presence, even if you’re working from your spare bedroom or living room!

Low Overhead is a Bonus
If you’re an entrepreneur, you’ll love the low overhead that is part and parcel of a virtual office. Those who are working alone will find that they save lots of money by using their homes (or other places) in order to do business remotely. It’s obviously much cheaper than renting office space. As well, if you employ others, and they work from virtual offices, you won’t need to pay for their equipment, space, heat, hot water…the list goes on!
Studies have shown that people who work remotely from virtual offices have better attitudes. If you want to be happier and more positive, this type of work setup may be very beneficial for you. It’s all about choosing a modern way of working which costs less and may even amp up productivity.

Now that you know some of the benefits of working from a virtual office, you’ll be ready to decide if working remotely is right for you (and for those whom you employ).

What are the differences between Directors and Shareholders?

In Singapore, just like in most jurisdictions, there are glaring differences between Directors and Shareholders. One of the major differences between directors and shareholders in Singapore is that whereas a shareholder owns part of the company, he or she is not actively involved in the day to day running of the company.

A director, on the other hand takes a more active role in the day to day management of the company provided such powers are within the provisions of the Memorandum and Articles of Association of the company and the Singapore Companies Act. Further details on the differences between directors and shareholders are as follows:

Directors:

For one to register a Private Limited Company in Singapore, one of the key requirements is that at least one of the directors of the company must be a Singapore Permanent Resident, a Singapore citizen or an Entrepreneur pass holder.

In general, the duties of a director do fall under two relatively broad categories. The first category involves statutory duties of care, skill and diligence. The second category involves general law duties or fiduciary duties of good faith and loyalty.

Statutory duties are generally defined as administrative duties and are enforceable through the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA) of Singapore. Some of the duties include performing general duties of disclosure. It also includes the maintenance and regular updating of the company’s accounting records and preparing the financial statements for the company to be used during the Annual General Meeting (AGM). The director must also ensure that the first AGM is held anytime within the initial 18 months after incorporation. After this initial AGM, another one must be held every calendar year at intervals not exceeding 15 months.

The director must also ensure that there are regular shareholders and director meetings to review the companies trading and financial position. He or she must also appoint a qualified auditor within the first 3 months after the company’s incorporations. It is also the responsibility of the director to keep and maintain members register and keep other statutory books at the registered offices of the organization.

Fiduciary or general law duties on the other hand are enforced by the registered company and generally imply that all the directors must always act in utmost good faith and in the interests of their employees, customers, creditors, suppliers and the community in general before making a decision. They are also expected to use this privilege to act on behalf of the company wisely; they should also not place themselves in a position of conflict by engaging in activities that conflict the interests of the company.

Guided by the Companies Act Sec 339(3), a director should not incur debts where there is reasonable ground to believe that the company will not be able to offset the said debt. This only comes to play when there are legal proceedings against the company or it is being wound up. Under Sec 157 (2) of the same act, directors are prohibited from using any information they get by virtue of their position as directors to meet their individual gains and enrich themselves or to the detriment of the company.

 

Shareholders:

In the case of shareholders, their duties are rather straightforward. They tend to be more concerned with ensuring that appointed directors are performing their duties as required and within the law.

In Singapore, all registered companies are required to at least have one shareholder. They are defined as individuals who have invested some money in the company and expect some reasonable return on their investment. As per Singapore laws shareholders have the power to modify, repeal or adopt provisions listed in the Company’s Memorandum or Articles of Association.

They also have the power to approve appointed editors and remove directors from office in case of public companies if and when required. Shareholders also have the power to veto certain capital reductions.

In instances where the board is unable to act, shareholders usually have reserve powers to act on the matter in question. They can also refuse to or ratify directors’ actions. Shareholders can also commence and subsequently prosecute legal proceedings where the suspects control the company.

Why is Singapore one of the Best Global Cities to do Business?

Why is Singapore one of the best global cities to do business?

Firstly, Singapore has a promising jurisdiction for registering a company and addressing business management.  In the world rankings of doing business, Singapore has a leading role for many years.

Secondly, there is virtually no corruption in Singapore, there is no external state debt, and the trade balance is positive on a constant basis. Singapore is one of the international financial centres with developed economy based on trade and sector service.

Thirdly, Singapore is in the white list of countries that are favourable for companies to do business. And first of all it is due to high reputation of the jurisdiction, as well as taking into account the highly favourable tax regime and a developed system of protecting the interests of businesses and investors. Such conditions allow to easily register a company in Singapore and to do business in favourable atmosphere.

According to a study conducted by CNN Time Warner Group, Singapore is ranked 5th in the world in terms of friendliness to small businesses. Ahead of it are only New Zealand, the USA, Canada and Australia. The study took into account such factors as the time to form a Singapore company, laws, tax policies and the different types of business activity etc.

Having own business in Singapore is a dream of every entrepreneur.  Registering a company or business in Singapore takes about 1 to 2 days, and the further conduct of business is not complicated by unnecessary bureaucratic delays. With so many benefits, it is no wonder that Singapore is among the best global cities to do business.

 

Setting up a Company

If you already have the idea of a business, it’s time to move to action. The minimum share capital is a nominal $1, the minimum number of shareholders is one, and the license for most businesses is not required. Foreigners can own 100% of the shares. In fact, the only legal requirement is that the director of the company must be a resident of Singapore.

But there is an option when a foreign businessman receives a work visa either Entrepreneur pass or Employment pass. In this case you can do your business even without the Singaporean director. Application for a work visa is processed by the Singapore Ministry of Manpower and if you have a higher education such as Bachelor’s Degree with business experience, no problems should arise in the work visa application.

In order to start your own business, the easiest way to do that is to apply to one of many consulting or law firms in Singapore. There you will be not only explained in detail all the conditions for the establishment and running your own business in the country, but the company secretary will help you to arrange the Singapore company registration in just a few days.

What is CPF, SINDA, CDAC and MENDAKI Schemes?

What is CPF?

Central Provident Fund (CPF) scheme was set up in 1955 as a social security savings system. The main objective of the scheme is to ensure that Singaporeans are self-reliant in society. Back then, it only functioned as a retirement savings scheme for employees. Today, the savings scheme has expanded to include more aspects of social security functions which include asset enhancement, family protection, healthcare and home ownership. Singapore registered companies are required to contribute CPF monthly for its employees at the rates set out in the Central Provident Fund Act (Cap. 36).

Under the CPF scheme, Singaporean employees and employers are required to make monthly contributions. CPF contributions by both the employees and employers (in both SMEs and MNCs) are determined by the employees age, wage rate and their year of PR status (for permanent residents). The total CPF contributions required from both employees and employers are summarized on the table below:

Details of the specific CPF contribution rate can be found on the CPF website.

The contributions will be divided into the three accounts of the employees, which are the Ordinary Account, Special Account and the Medisave Account respectively:

  • Funds in the Ordinary Account can be used to pay for housing, insurance, investments as well as education.
  • The funds in the Special Account can be used for if employees wish to invest in financial products which are retirement-related.
  • Employees in Singapore can use the Medisave Account to pay for hospitalization and other medical needs.

CPF savings may be withdrawn by employees upon reaching the age of 55. However, a CPF Minimum Sum would need to be set aside. This Minimum Sum ensures that the retired would be able to afford basic necessities during retirement. The retired have the option to place the sum in a participating bank, in CPF’s Retirement it to purchase a life annuity with an insurance company.

Upon reaching the drawdown age, currently 63, monthly payouts will be received by CPF members. In addition, CPF Members may also opt for the CPF LIFE scheme. In this scheme, CPF members will receive a monthly income for life, starting from their drawdown age.

Healthcare

Under the healthcare function, employees in Singapore have a Medisave Account which assists in accumulating savings for healthcare needs. Funds from this account can be used to pay for hospital expenses as well as specialized outpatient treatment, like chemotherapy and radiotherapy, for both the employees and their dependent.

Employees can use their Medisave Account to pay pre miums for the following programs:

  • MediShield- A medical insurance scheme that assists CPF members to pay for large hospital cost.
  • ElderShield- An insurance scheme which covers healthcare needs of older CPF members requiring long term care.

Home Ownership

CPF members can use funds in their Ordinary Account to purchase a home. Home buyers can choose to either purchase a HDB Flat through the Public Housing Scheme, or a private property through the Residential Properties Scheme. In addition home buyers can also use the funds to pay their monthly housing payments.

Family Protection

Under the Family Protection function, a Dependent’s Protection Scheme is available, which ensures that families can cope for a few years in the event where the CPF member’s dependents face permanent incapacity or death.

Asset Protection

Under the CPF scheme, CPF members can invest funds from the Ordinary Account to purchase assets such as Fixed Deposits, Unit Trusts, Bonds, Treasury Bills, Shares as well as Gold.

What is MENDAKI Funds?

Mendaki Funds is a scheme whereby contributions by the Muslim community in Singapore are used to fund educational and social welfare programs for the Muslim community in Singapore.

This scheme requires all Muslim Singaporeans, PR’s and foreign workers working in Singapore to contribute to the Mendaki Fund. The required contribution amount depends on the contributor’s wage level as shown below:

Monthly total wages1 Minimum monthly contribution
Less than $1,0012 $2.00
$1,001 – $2,000 $3.50
$2,001 – $3,000 $5.00
$3,001 – $4,000 $12.50
$4,001 and above $16.00

One of the functions of the Mendaki funds is to provide training to the Muslim workforce in Singapore, through the MENDAKI Social Enterprise Network Singapore Pte. Ltd. This ensures that they would be ready for employment in the job market. SMEs will benefit from such programs as organizations like these would assist employers in finding suitable employees with the necessary skills set for the required job.

What is CDAC funds?

The CDAC funds is a funding scheme similar to the Mendaki Scheme, except it caters to the needs of the Chinese community. Similarly, all Chinese employees can choose to make contributions to the CDAC funds, according to their wage level, as shown below, although employees may choose to opt out of contributing:

Wage level

Minimum monthly contribution

Less than $2,000

$0.50

$2,000 and above

$1.00

Similarly, part of the funds from the CDAC scheme would be used for the CDAC Skills Training Award Scheme, which helps low-income and low-skilled Chinese workers learn industry-related skills to assist them in finding employment. SMEs will also benefit from these as the companies can now have a wider range of lower waged and skilled labor to choose from when recruiting candidates for employment.

What is SINDA funds?

The SINDA funds is a scheme similar to both the Mendaki and CDAC funds, except it is used to provide social and employment help for the Indian community in Singapore. All employees in the Indian community in Singapore may choose to contribute to the funds based on their wage levels (shown below), although it is not compulsory.

Wage level

Minimum monthly contribution

Up to $600

$1.00

Above $600 – $1,500

$3.00

Above $1,500 – $2,500

$5.00

Above $2,500

$7.00

What is Skill Development Levy (SDL)?

The Skills Development Levy (SDL) is a scheme by which the CPF Board collects a levy, which would then be allocated as grants to help companies send their workers for training. Thus, SMEs can benefit from this scheme as it would enable the companies to obtain a better qualified team of employees which would in turn boost the company’s productivity.

Under this scheme, employers (in both SMEs and MNCs) must contribute a Skills Development Levy at a rate of 0.25% of the employees’ monthly remuneration, up to the first $4,500.

SDL is currently administrated by the Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA).

How to Set Up a Restaurant Business in Singapore?

With Singaporeans’ huge appetite for eating out and their willingness to spend big bucks on food, it has given rise to a variety of food and beverage (F&B) businesses in Singapore. Once you have decided that Singapore is the ideal place to setup your restaurant, the following steps will provide you the necessary information to kick start your restaurant business. The first step in opening a restaurant business is to register a company in Singapore. For foreign owners, it is not compulsory for them to relocate to Singapore to set up their business. However, under the Singapore Immigration Regulations, if a foreigner wishes to move to Singapore to run his restaurant, he must apply for an Entrepass.

Step 1: Incorporate a Company / Business in Singapore

First of all, you need to register a business or company in Singapore. A Singaporean or Permanent Resident can register the business or company alone as a single director company. SSIC code of the company should reflect the actual types of food business such as cafes, snack bars, fast food restaurants and restaurants etc.

Step 2: Food Shop License

According to Singapore’s Environmental Public Health Act, a Food Shop Licence issued by the National Environment Agency (NEA), is necessary if a person is intended to run a retail food outlet where food and/or drink are sold wholly by retail in Singapore.

Hence, after you have finished your company registration and any relocation visa matters, you will have to decide on your restaurant’s location since the authorities will examine the location before granting an approval for the license.

In addition, when applying for the Food Shop License, you must have the following supporting documents listed below:

  • A photocopy of one of the following (where applicable):
    • Both sides of NRIC of applicant (if applying as an individual) or
    • Business profile of the company (if applying as a company) or
    • Certificate of registration from Registrar of Societies (if applying as a society)
  • A scaled metric layout plan of the restaurant such as the kitchen, preparation area, refreshment area, toilets, stores and etc.
  • Tenancy agreement among the landlord and the applicant.
  • Approval(s) from Housing Development Board (HDB) [for HDB premises only], Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) & / or Building and Construction Authority (BCA) [where applicable]
  • The list of food handlers employed.
  • Typhoid inoculation certificates for food handlers.
  • X-ray certificates for food handlers that are 45 years old and above.
  • The list of Food Hygiene Officers hired using the prescribed form obtainable from the relevant Regional Office.

Step 3: Hiring of Employees

Owners have to be aware that employees in the restaurant business in Singapore tend to consist of both local and foreign workers. Thus, if you are planning to hire foreign employees, you have to ensure that they have a work permit.

Step 4: Halal Establishment Scheme

If you are also planning to have Muslims as customers, it is vital to have a Halal certificate by the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS) – the authority for Halal certification in Singapore. With this certificate, Muslims can enjoy their meal without having to worry if they violated their laws and beliefs.

Step 5: Liquor Licence

If you desire to serve liquor in your restaurant, you would require a Liquor License from the Liquor Licensing Board (LLB).

There are 4 main types of Liquor licence:

  • Public house licence
  • Beer house licence
  • Wholesale liquor/Retail liquor shop licence
  • Wholesale beer/Retail beer licence

Depending on the type of license, the fee range from S$220 to S$1760 for a period of two years. The processing time for approval of application will take at least 14 working days.

Step 6: Goods and Services Tax (GST) Registration

Any business that has annual revenue of S$1million or more must register for GST, also known as value added tax (VAT). Currently, Singapore’s GST is 7%. However, if your annual restaurant revenue is less than S$1 million, registering for GST is optional.

Step 7: CPF Registration

You need to make Central Provident Fund (CPF) contributions for any employee you hire, as long as he or she receives more than S$50 a month. However, CPF contribution for foreign employees with Employment Pass or Work Permit is not required.

Step 8: Registration to import processed Food products and Appliances

If you intend to import processed food products and food appliances, you have to apply for a Registration Number from the Food Control Division (FCD) of Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA).

After going through the 8 steps above, you are now better equipped with the knowledge to set up your restaurant business in Singapore.

How to Set Up a Hawker Stall?

Who is eligible to setup a hawker stall?

Setting up a hawker stall would require the applicant to be a Singapore Citizen or Permanent Resident and at least 21 years old who is not bankrupt. Applicants with revoked licences or have been de-registered are not eligible. It is also prohibited to apply to operate 2 or more cooked food stalls within the same centre. Hawker license can be secured through forming a Singapore company or you can apply under your personal name.

 

Procedure to set up a hawker stall in Singapore: 

Step 1: Secure Your Premises
Before setting up a hawker stall in Singapore, it is important to meet the eligibility requirements. One requirement would include securing a premise (hawker stall) as it is a requirement to acquire a one in order to obtain a Hawker Stall Licence.


Step 2: Register Your Food Handlers
It is compulsory to register all your food handlers with the National Environment Agency (NEA). Hence, if you run an F&B establishment, you would have to make sure that every food handler have to complete the WSQ Follow Food & Beverage Safety and Hygiene Policies and Procedures course before dealing with the food. Failure in ensuring that all food handlers are registered would result in a fine of up to S$2,000 and given demerit points under the Points Demerit System (PDS). Your Hawker Stall Licence would be suspended or revoked when you accumulate more than 12 demerit points in a 12-month period. Take note that when applying for a Hawker Stall Licence, you will be required to provide names and details of registered food handlers in your business.

 

Step 3: Obtain Hawker Stall Licence
Under the Environmental Public Health Act, it is a requirement to apply for a Hawker Stall Licence if you are planning to run a retail food stall where food and/or drinks are sold. This act of licencing ensures cleanliness and food safety in food retail outlets and hence averting food-borne diseases. Take note that you need this licence to operate a hawker stall rented from the Government. If you are operating a food stall inside a privately-owned food shop, you should apply for a Food Stall Licence instead. If you are operating a food shop, you should apply for a Food Shop Licence instead. To be eligible for this licence, the applicant has to be either a Singapore Citizen or Permanent Resident and be at least 21 years old.

 

Complying with Environmental Health Regulations
It is crucial to comply with environmental health regulations as demerit points would be given to stalls that violate these protocols and risk having their licence suspended or revoked. To oversee the food safety standards being conducted in F&B establishments, NEA has developed the Points Demerit System (PDS). This system awards demerit points to establishments that violates regulations and F&B licences can be suspended or revoked when excessive points are accumulated. Revoked licences would ban the applicant from applying for another licence to operate an F&B business from the NEA.

How to set up a publishing business in Singapore?

How to set up a publishing business in Singapore? Typically, a business owner may want to register a Singapore Private Limited Company to enjoy limited liabilities for the shareholders and company enjoy 3 years of profit tax exemption for first $100,000 dollars of profit.

Singapore is noted for having one of the highest literacy rates in the world. Thus, people would have a high expectation of the quality of publications and would require a constant need of it. Sturdy protection of Intellectual Property rights, combined with easy business set-up procedure and large pool of human capital makes Singapore the perfect country for setting up a publishing business. Some major industry players that have set up publishing business here include McGraw-Hill Education and Cambridge University Press, while local brands consist of SPH Magazines and World Scientific Publishing.

A publishing business in Singapore must obtain a Newspaper Permit from the Media Development Authority of Singapore (MDA). The permit must be applied if it involves printing or publication of newspaper in Singapore. Newspaper refers to any publication consisting of news, reports of occurrences, observations, any matter of public interest, printed in any language and issued for sale or free distribution.

The selling or distribution of offshore newspaper also requires the permit. Offshore newspapers are published outside Singapore weekly which reports on political and current affairs in Southeast Asia. It has a circulation rate of more than 300 copies.

The owner or the Chief Editor of the publication must submit an application form and supporting documents include:

  1. A mock-up duplicate of the recent issues of the publication if it is a magazine (Current Affairs, Women’s Interest, Fashion, Recreational or Performing Arts, Entertainment and Leisure Tourist Guide, or Lifestyle)
  2. Copy of the Foreign Identification Number (FIN) document and passport if the applicant is a foreigner living in Singapore
  3. Letter of Authorization is obligatory if the applicant is a third-party

The Newspaper Permit is free of charge for local newspapers. Bank guarantee of S$200,000 would be required for offshore newspapers. The permit lasts for a year and takes about 15 working days for successful requests. It is non-transferable and change of permit holders, name of newspaper, language, nature of contents, or frequency of publication require new submission of the permit. Within 3 months of obtaining the permit, first issue of publication must be published. Following, two copies of every issue to be submitted to the Registrar of Newspapers

For companies who are printing newspapers and/or magazines in Singapore, a Printing Press Licence is needed from the Registrar of Newspapers.

Before applying for the license, there are conditions to be met:

  • URA must approve of the location used for printing the media
  • Registration with Singapore Companies Registrar, ACRA

After which supporting documents are as such:

  • Letter of Authorization is obligatory if the applicant is a third-party
  • Registered company’s address is different from the location of printing usage, documentary proof from Chief Inspector of Factories is needed and subject to approval

Similar to the Newspaper Permit, it has a validity of one year but takes only 3 days to process the application. No fees are required and it is also non-transferable. Change of owner of license or location of printing would result to new license being applied.

As for online publishing, a licence is not mandatory. Conversely, content providers on the internet that charges fees for online newspaper would need to register with MDA. Within 14 days of the initiation of the service, the applicant must complete the form and submit to MDA. The person applying would need to be the managing editor, executive editor, or any other person who controls the policy of the online publication.

There are details that must be provided to the MDA. These details are as follows:

  • The name and address of the publisher
  • Place of business incorporation
  • Website particulars such as title
  • IP address
  • URL
  • Subscription rates
  • Date of commencement
  • Nature of content
  • Language of publication
  • Details of the web publisher
  • Particulars of the web host

How to set up a publishing business in Singapore?

How to set up a publishing business in Singapore? Typically, a business owner may want to register a Singapore Private Limited Company to enjoy limited liabilities for the shareholders and company enjoy 3 years of profit tax exemption for first $100,000 dollars of profit.

Singapore is noted for having one of the highest literacy rates in the world. Thus, people would have a high expectation of the quality of publications and would require a constant need of it. Sturdy protection of Intellectual Property rights, combined with easy business set-up procedure and large pool of human capital makes Singapore the perfect country for setting up a publishing business. Some major industry players that have set up publishing business here include McGraw-Hill Education and Cambridge University Press, while local brands consist of SPH Magazines and World Scientific Publishing.

A publishing business in Singapore must obtain a Newspaper Permit from the Media Development Authority of Singapore (MDA). The permit must be applied if it involves printing or publication of newspaper in Singapore. Newspaper refers to any publication consisting of news, reports of occurrences, observations, any matter of public interest, printed in any language and issued for sale or free distribution.

The selling or distribution of offshore newspaper also requires the permit. Offshore newspapers are published outside Singapore weekly which reports on political and current affairs in Southeast Asia. It has a circulation rate of more than 300 copies.

The owner or the Chief Editor of the publication must submit an application form and supporting documents include:

  1. A mock-up duplicate of the recent issues of the publication if it is a magazine (Current Affairs, Women’s Interest, Fashion, Recreational or Performing Arts, Entertainment and Leisure Tourist Guide, or Lifestyle)
  2. Copy of the Foreign Identification Number (FIN) document and passport if the applicant is a foreigner living in Singapore
  3. Letter of Authorization is obligatory if the applicant is a third-party

The Newspaper Permit is free of charge for local newspapers. Bank guarantee of S$200,000 would be required for offshore newspapers. The permit lasts for a year and takes about 15 working days for successful requests. It is non-transferable and change of permit holders, name of newspaper, language, nature of contents, or frequency of publication require new submission of the permit. Within 3 months of obtaining the permit, first issue of publication must be published. Following, two copies of every issue to be submitted to the Registrar of Newspapers

For companies who are printing newspapers and/or magazines in Singapore, a Printing Press Licence is needed from the Registrar of Newspapers.

Before applying for the license, there are conditions to be met:

  • URA must approve of the location used for printing the media
  • Registration with Singapore Companies Registrar, ACRA

After which supporting documents are as such:

  • Letter of Authorization is obligatory if the applicant is a third-party
  • Registered company’s address is different from the location of printing usage, documentary proof from Chief Inspector of Factories is needed and subject to approval

Similar to the Newspaper Permit, it has a validity of one year but takes only 3 days to process the application. No fees are required and it is also non-transferable. Change of owner of license or location of printing would result to new license being applied.

As for online publishing, a licence is not mandatory. Conversely, content providers on the internet that charges fees for online newspaper would need to register with MDA. Within 14 days of the initiation of the service, the applicant must complete the form and submit to MDA. The person applying would need to be the managing editor, executive editor, or any other person who controls the policy of the online publication.

There are details that must be provided to the MDA. These details are as follows:

  • The name and address of the publisher
  • Place of business incorporation
  • Website particulars such as title
  • IP address
  • URL
  • Subscription rates
  • Date of commencement
  • Nature of content
  • Language of publication
  • Details of the web publisher
  • Particulars of the web host

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